(L120) Benefits of The Ron Paul Curriculum

NOTE: If you are looking for an accurate and honest recount of what the RPC is like, please see my article/essay The Truth About Gary North & The Ron Paul Curriculum

1.) No stress
Let your children go at their own pace, and don’t sweat it if something comes up. There is always tomorrow and you are in charge of the deadlines!

2.) Timely online support for parents and students
If you have a question that other students on the forum cannot help you with, just shoot an email over! Quick and simple.

3.) Flexibility
Whatever schedule you or your children may be on, the RPC will work for you. Since you are in charge of when everything needs to be done, you can change times and goals of assignments to fit your personal schedule.

4.) Personally tailored to your needs
If your child wants to learn more about something specific that the RPC does not have, you have the ability to get them that education elsewhere. Because the RPC does not issue diplomas, it is up to you to decide what criteria must be met to get a high school credit. This can mean completely creating your own course! (I did this last year – I started and ran my own business. It was successful, and great training!)

5.) Average cost with no monetary risk
At around $500 a year, the cost of this curriculum is nothing above average. Your membership and courses come with a (time limited) money-back guarantee; if it doesn’t work for you and your family, get your money back and go elsewhere!

6.) Great professors & complete courses
From well known names like Tom Woods to Gary North, your child is guaranteed top-notch educators. All courses are complete, and consistent. You will never have to worry about going elsewhere for information – each class has been meticulously planned.

7.) student to student interaction
The comment/constructive criticism boards are all student run. This means that students hear many angles of feedback, rather than just one response from the teacher. Everyone helps each other and it is a great sense of community.

8.) Entrepreneurship training
Typical college is not the only route to success! Teach your children all about CLEP exams, starting a business, and so much more. Your child will pick up on hundreds of life-hacks throughout the course of their education that they could not acquire anywhere else.

9.) Real-life training and preparation
Most adults know the struggles of learning to do taxes, what money really is and where it comes from, etc. But wouldn’t life have been so much easier if you had learned these things before you had to put them into practice? The RPC has your children covered with a personal finance course, government 1A & 1B, business, and many more. Your children  have to stress like you did after their personal real-life preparation courses.

10.) The course plans are already made for you – just set your kids up and let them go!
No more late nights planning and stressing out; with the RPC all you need to do is give the kids deadlines for their work and let them go. Every lesson, assignment and course is already created and structured for you.

11.) You have more time to focus on each child because they learn independently.
Chances are, when one kid needs help the other will be preoccupied with a lecture or essay. Since you are not teaching them all at once by yourself, you can focus individual attention without slowing your other children down. The time of a homeschooling parent is precious, and the ability to successfully stretch yourself over multiple kids in a school day is priceless.

12.) Freedom based curriculum (Austrian Economics)
Do you want your kids to grow up sharing the same core values as you and your spouse? If so, then look no further. You kids, no matter their age, will be taught in language that they understand the truth about freedom and how to live a liberty-based life.

13.) Christian insight and problem solving with morality are always present
If you are looking to avoid the spineless and inconsistent teachings of the public school system, then you have found your destination. Here with the RPC your children will learn that the right, just, and moral thing to do not only corresponds with the freedom and rights of each individual, but with the core teachings of Christianity as well.

14.) Non-violent approach to a quite violent world
Your children will learn when they are being coerced, and when they are having their rights violated. They will also learn how to deal with these occurrences in a calm, non-violent, non-aggressive manor in order to deescalate the situation.

15.) Political knowledge and understanding
Teaching students how to act and thrive in the real world both politically and socially is extremely important. Knowing your enemy is half the battle, and the RPC will gear up every student with the knowledge to defend their stance.

(L70) Not Enough Hours in The Day

What would it take for Dr. North to persuade me to use Spreeder for 10 minutes a day?

Quite honestly, for Dr. North to persuade me to use Spreeder for 10 minutes a day, he would need to make this a part of the time he allocates for schoolwork. I am extremely busy; I work nearly 30 hours a week, I do school 25-30 hours a week, and I volunteer about 5 hours a week or more. Sundays, I am at church and it is a family day. This is my one day a week to take a break and be grateful for all that happened in the past 6 days.

The down time I do have, ever so slight as it may be, just simply will not be used for school. Even if it is only ten minutes a day. My reasoning for this is that I truly believe that my few hours a day to relax and unwind lead to a more productive day. If I know I have no down time, I have nothing to look forward to in the day. It seems to drag on endlessly, and instead of doing the work because it is good for my brain, I do it because I need to. In this sense, I learn much less because I am not invested.

If Dr. North believes that this is as crucial to our education as he claims, he would make it a mandatory piece of our school day throughout his courses. This could mean less reading, more spreeder; it could also mean shorter lectures.

I do understand that I am the only one losing by not making time for this, but it is simply not a possibility in my life right now, and I am okay with that.

 

(L60) My Humanity or My Technology?

Which three time-allocation changes could increase my productivity the most. Why?

The top three things I could change in terms of unproductive time use are over-sleeping, technology, and technology.

Now, I do understand that I provided 2 unproductive habits, rather than three. But, the amount of wasted time that I can dedicate to electronics deserves two slots in this essay. The reason being: I am addicted. I honestly do not have very much free time and when I do, I use it sleeping or watching television.

I am absolutely more likely to get more free time in each day if I ‘budget’ my sleeping habits to the necessary amount. Sleeping early and rising early would give me a leg up on my responsibilities; my energy levels however may not match those of that when I sleep on my own bodies schedule. This change in energy may also cost me some amount of productivity. (It is very hard for me to sleep early and rise early. I am quite the night owl, and mornings are just about the bane of my existence.)

Technology is not my only habit of relaxation, but it the only habit which can be labeled unproductive. I love to knit, bead/make jewelry and trinkets, and write. Sometimes I even do these things while I watch TV (because otherwise I get bored). However, I find myself at all hours of the day and the night on my iPad. My laptop. My cellphone (when I still had an iPhone at least). Sometimes I am so plugged in that I wish someone would pour water on me and make me short circuit back into the real world.

Thousands of hours lost to oversleeping and screen-based products. Imagine the things I could buy if I spent those hours working. Or the things I would know had I spent those hours learning. Not to mention all the skills I could have mastered if I spent that time training. And from all of these things, I can merely conclude that I have cost myself the most precious thing of all, time. Time to meet new people and build lasting relationships. Time to help others, and heal the world. I have lost time that I owe the Lord; time that should have been spent with praise, thanks and love.

I have lost enough time to realize that I have just about lost my humanity, but not so much that I cannot reclaim the time to come.

 

 

 

(L45) Loans & Depreciation

Why shouldn’t I borrow to buy something that depreciates?

I will never borrow money to pay for an item that depreciates in value because in the long-run, the item will end up costing me even more than it should have in the first place. Say, for example, that I borrowed money to buy a brand new car. Well, not only will I be paying interest on the loan that I used to buy the car with, but the car will also immediately drop in value the second that I drive it off of the lot.

In short, this means that I am going to pay more than the car is actually worth from the minute it’s mine. On top of the extra money I am paying to own the new car which will only decrease in value over time, I am paying money to the person I borrowed from. Added together, I am paying a great amount more for the car than it is physically worth. Five years down the line, the car will sell for even less money than it would have the year before. Basically it is just a great loss to me in terms of the future.

Another reason not to borrow money for something that depreciates in value is the issue of repayment to the lender. Borrowing money to invest in a business for example would be a great future oriented decision. A business would bring in more income (hopefully) than it cost me, and I would be able to repay the lender with the least amount of interest costs possible. However, borrowing money to pay for an item that loses value over time will only make it more difficult for me to repay the lender because I am losing money (value) each day. This will also result in me paying more money in interest than I would had I invested in something that has increasing value over time.

(L55) High Bid Wins or First Come, First Served?

In what area of your life would you prefer ‘first come, first served’ to ‘high bid wins’? Why?

Well, in my current situation first come first served is more convenient for me than high bid wins because, quite honestly, I am nearly broke and I have more time than money. Convenience however does not always equate to morality, and so I would have to say that I would always prefer high bid wins. My reason for this is that by deciding first come first serve should be the standard of the market, I am penalizing people who’s time is more valuable than their money.

A high bid wins standard throughout the market would be comparable to (something along the lines of) a six-flags line for a ride. There would be two lines alongside one another; one where time is less valuable so the wait is longer and the price is cheaper, and one line in which you can pay more for a shorter wait. This is a more fair, and  free market based system of serving customers because it favors both people who have more money, and people who have more time. Nobody is penalized or excluded.

Another example of this would be online shopping. Nobody waits in line to shop on the internet, they just pay and wait for their product to be shipped. At checkout however, there is an option to pay more in order to have the product shipped faster. The idea of high bid wins, otherwise known as priority shipping, is not condemned in society because it is private. However should this system be applied in public, people who have been trained their whole lives to wait in line become outraged, as they feel their have been cheated or treated unfairly by this high bid wins system of market freedom.

(L30) How Much Is Television Really Costing You?

How much money won’t I have at age 70 if I keep watching TV? Is TV worth this?

For the past week, each day I have recorded the amount of time I have spent watching television. I had estimated that I would be watching around 15-20 hours of television a week; the total ended up being extremely close at 15 hours and 2 minutes. Now to calculate how much money I would be losing in this time, I decided to multiply 15 hours (a week) by 4; this left me with 60 hours a month lost to television. I then plugged this information into a compound interest calculator at $1200 dollars a month (assuming I would be making $20 an hour at the very least running my own business), with 53 years to grow at a 10% interest rate. (I am 17 years old right now, so in 53 years I will be 70 years old. Because the compound interest calculator does not accept $0 as a current principle, I was left to enter $1.) At this rate of television viewing, by the time I am 70 yeas old, I will have lost $22,355,756.67! Now that is a lot of money!

Exercises like this help people such as myself realize how valuable time really is, and more specifically, how much downtime will cost you in the long-run! Who needs a few hours of relaxation every night if you can spend the better portion of your life relaxing because you spent those extra hours working. Television is absolutely not worth the cost, however to be fair, I do find myself watching more sermons, speeches, and outreach missions than meaningless television shows. I use the majority of my television time to learn, and expand my understandings of The Bible and God’s world around me. This learning time is important to me; it has a lot of value to me in an informational sense, as well as a relaxation sense. There will always be trade offs between time and money throughout each persons lifetime; value however is subjective, and so this is a decision each person needs make for themselves.

(L25) Budgeting

How does making a budget reduce impulse shopping?

Making a budget reduces impulse shopping and impulse buys by allowing you to exercise self-restraint in advance. Having a plan with your money causes you to be as thrifty as possible in the moment, and price compare before purchasing an item. Planning ahead also allows time to look both online and in multiple stores; this decision is a trade off between time and money that each person must make for themselves depending on how they value each commodity. Another reason budgeting is helpful for a healthy wallet is that it makes it very difficult to spend money that you do not have, which is something that many people struggle with. It is easy to swipe now, and think about what the price is later; however this can lead to serious debt and lifetime troubles.