(L140) Bureaucracy & Brainwashing

Is tax-funded education inherently bureaucratic?

For the sake of simplicity, yes. The reason that we know this is because of the entire set-up of the educational system. First, money goes from the taxpayer’s wallets to the government. This money is then split up and a portion goes into public schools. Since the government is technically the source giving the money directly to the schools, it is the government who decides what the schools teach. In other words, he who pays the piper calls the tune.

Public schools are an area/branch of the state; bureaucracy is the system through which such areas/branches are monitored. The monitoring is done through bureaucrats themselves – in the case of public schools, the bureaucrats are teachers and administrators. Each leader and/or representative of a tax-funded school is given a book of laws governing the entirety of their actions. This rule book spans from disciplinary action plans, to educational lesson plans and academic requirements. Again we find the issue of underlying special interests: the government is funding education through coercion, and mandating teachers every step dictating what they may and may not teach. (Otherwise known as common core education.) Government (tax) funded education goes beyond being a conflict of interest; rather it simply becomes means of indoctrinating children with a distorted and immoral view of life. Government schools dictate the teachings of statism because they are directly founded on statist principles. Tax funded education is undeniably and inherently bureaucratic.

(L130) The Ron Paul Curriculum & USPs

Identify at least two possible USP’s for the Ron Paul Curriculum. Defend each choice.

As a current student of the Ron Paul Curriculum, I must think back on the things that originally drew me in and ultimately led me to the decision of using this curriculum. These specific advertising points are called unique selling points; or USPs for short.

The first thing that comes to mind in identifying a USP of the RPC is the name itself: The Ron Paul Curriculum. Ron Paul’s endorsement is not only exclusive to this homeschool program, but it also led me to understand that it would be an education founded on the principles of liberty and freedom. This is extremely unique, and something that one does not forget; especially because the foundations are implied within the title. On that note, the Ron Paul Curriculum also offers classes taught by extremely well known advocates of the Austrian school of economics. When surveyed, parents reported that the number one reason for homeschooling their children was so that they would be able to incorporate religious and moral instruction into their daily education. The Ron Paul Curriculum is also Christian based (but not absolutely mandatory for students to follow the curriculum); so it covers both the moral bases, and religious bases of any families needs.

Another unique selling point of the RPC is the student-run feedback boards. This deals immediately with the issue of creating social connections for homeschooled children (and families). Many homeschooling families look for social interaction outlets from third party programs including town sports, summer programs/camps, musical enrichment, and much more. However the Ron Paul Curriculum incorporates community growth directly through the academic process, not only for educational advancement, but also for the growth of personal and recreational relationships. This is a unique selling point for the Ron Paul Curriculum because aside from encouraging a strong supporting community of like-minded families and children, it also teaches children independence by asserting their abilities to problem solve. Through allowing the students themselves to help teach and correct each other, each individual is able to attain leadership skills, confidence, and as previously stated, independence. These types of academic exercises are not found in typical curriculums or schooling programs; they lead to more mature and educated children at a younger age.

Lastly, one of the most interesting unique selling points of the Ron Paul Curriculum, is the age-grade guideline gap. I call this a gap specifically because the RPC, like no other, encourages parents to stop enforcing age-based grade levels! The founders believe that there is a great difference (or gap) between a child’s age, and their corresponding (traditional school) grade placement. It is widely understood that children learn at their own pace; placing them with other students who share nothing more than an age will cause them to learn either faster or slower than they are capable of. Placing them in different courses based upon their abilities is the best way to maximize their educational life-span, and teach them absolutely as much as possible. This takes away the frustration and stress of a typical classroom, and allows for clear, level-headed learning day in and day out. It is also the opinion of the RPC founders/endorsers that children should begin learning as early as possible! Waiting until your child has turned four or five to place them into an educational environment is a waste of such precious time! The younger your children are, the more sponge-like their brains are. When you have an education that is custom built to suit your child, learning is fun – not tear inducing (for children, or for parents); so it will be even easier to get them going on the path to academic success.

 

(L70) Not Enough Hours in The Day

What would it take for Dr. North to persuade me to use Spreeder for 10 minutes a day?

Quite honestly, for Dr. North to persuade me to use Spreeder for 10 minutes a day, he would need to make this a part of the time he allocates for schoolwork. I am extremely busy; I work nearly 30 hours a week, I do school 25-30 hours a week, and I volunteer about 5 hours a week or more. Sundays, I am at church and it is a family day. This is my one day a week to take a break and be grateful for all that happened in the past 6 days.

The down time I do have, ever so slight as it may be, just simply will not be used for school. Even if it is only ten minutes a day. My reasoning for this is that I truly believe that my few hours a day to relax and unwind lead to a more productive day. If I know I have no down time, I have nothing to look forward to in the day. It seems to drag on endlessly, and instead of doing the work because it is good for my brain, I do it because I need to. In this sense, I learn much less because I am not invested.

If Dr. North believes that this is as crucial to our education as he claims, he would make it a mandatory piece of our school day throughout his courses. This could mean less reading, more spreeder; it could also mean shorter lectures.

I do understand that I am the only one losing by not making time for this, but it is simply not a possibility in my life right now, and I am okay with that.