(L65) Some Answers Must Wait

I will sell my business when it makes a profit of [$??] a year, so that I can [??].

There are a few reasons why I cannot yet accurately provide an answer to this question.

The first being the fact that, I have no idea how much money I would be putting into this particular business to get it started. Would it be out of pocket, or from loans? How much money will I have ultimately paid in interest on those loans?

The second reason being that if my business is doing good enough to sell, that may just be all the reason in the world NOT to sell it! After all the hard work, sweat, and tears, I am just going to sell the polished business? I don’t think so! I will make more money owning the business myself than I will selling it. However, when it is time for me to retire and my days are almost done, it is more likely than not that I would pass this business in my family. This business is my legacy, and I will only leave it in the hands of those I most trust to upkeep my morals and standards within it.

There are plenty of reasons to sell a business, and while I cannot predict the future, I can be nearly sure that something I pour my lifeblood into will not so easily be bought.

(L80) My Retrospective Retirement Speech: What I Accomplished, and How I Did It

When I give my retirement speech one day, will be proud to say that I was able to overcome the hand I was dealt in childhood. I will be grateful to recount the fact that I broke the cycle of abusive relationships, divorce and traumatized children. I will hopefully be able to stand before my many children and grandchildren who will be healthy, happy and proud to call me theirs, and tell them that I followed my dreams, not my bank account. I will tell my family and friends how I took ahold of my education from a young age, and used that independence and self-discipline to open my own business one day; maybe a bakery or an animal rescue. I will tell them that God has carried me such a long way from where I began, and how he has gifted me with so many angels throughout my journey. I will tell them that even though my job was not always the same as my calling, I knew God would guide me exactly where I needed to be when I needed to be there; and that he will do the same for each and every one of the people surrounding me.

When I give my retirement speech, I hope that everything I aspire to be today as a seventeen year old will never change; I hope I will be able to look back on my life and see the generous, kind, loving and outgoing person I have always strived to be. And even though sometimes I may fall short, I hope that I never lower my expectations for myself, morally or physically. I hope I always follow my calling, and that I never give up on anything that is truly important to me or the people I love. I will be thankful to be able to say I am soulfully strong, and that I am full of joy for everything I have accomplished; I will be able to say this because I am a fighter, and I never backed down.

Lastly, I would thank God, and all my family and friends who stuck through the think and thin with me; especially my husband, Carmine, who I couldn’t have done any of this without. He has been my inspiration, my refuge and my guardian angel. I hope old age never softens us my love, because we are going to be the two most badass, lawless and loveable retirees that ever did live.

The Morality of Work and Wealth (L25)

The morality of work and wealth is much simpler than it seems when first considered. Although there are many specific jobs that can be argued either moral or immoral by different people, I like to think I take a pretty basic, and arguably ‘fair’ stance on the subject. In the wise words of my boyfriend, “wealth in itself cannot be moral or immoral,” but I do also believe that means of obtaining such wealth can be one of the two. It cannot be immoral to be wealthy if one hasn’t done anything wrong to gain their wealth. However, if one is harming others in the process of, or for making a profit, then this would be considered immoral. Thieves, scam artists / con artists, the list goes on and on. I wouldn’t say that just because one is breaking a law (in the process of making money) that their wealth is immoral, because this would mean I believe that all laws are moral; that, however is not to say that I don’t believe any laws are moral. This being said, it is only unjust that one man has more wealth than another when he has not worked honorably to earn this wealth. If you pit a hard working middle class man, against a politician, who lives a life of luxury by the plundering of this exact hard working man, and many others like him, then it is easy to see that the politician’s wealth is immoral. My grandmother has always told me two things to live by; “honor all your contracts, don’t harm your neighbor.” Upon hearing this day in and day out as my grandmother shoveled advice out to my friends like candy, I came to the conclusion that even the most complicated of situations will really boil down to these two things. To live a moral life is to make an honest earning, be kind, and let your word be as good as gold.